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Road Trip Packing Strategies Revealed

July 7, 2011 - Prologue
Road Trip Packing Strategies Revealed

This morning, I woke up on the floor. Fortunately the fall wasn’t painful, as I only dropped a few inches. Actually not even dropped, but rolled. I slept on an air mattress. No, not to practice before the trip. This has been a bare necessity, as my wife sold our bed the day before.

We keep crossing stuff off of the tasks list. The vehicles are sold, the utilities cancelled, most of our rubbish is either at Goodwill, at the Salvation Army or in our storage. The furniture keeps disappearing. People come and take it away. It’s no longer months and weeks, we’re down to a few days and it’s time to start counting hours. So far we’ve been unsuccessful in securing tenants for our house. It’s been on the market for almost a month now and even though the rent was calculated to barely cover the costs, we were forced to lower it. It means that we’ll actually pay for some people to live in our house! Other than that, I think we’re ready. There is still some junk in the garage and in our shed, but I’m sure we’ll be able to clean it out before departure. I think, we can start packing.

Car Packing

Car Packing

Disclaimer: The car pictured on the left is not ours, however we are seriously considering adopting similar packing strategy for our Sabbatical road trip.

We’ve been thinking about the most efficient way to pack the car. We’ll have a roof rack, in which we’ll carry all the camping gear and kitchen stuff. It’s fairly easily accessible and in the first part of our road trip, through the United States, we will use it the most. All four bikes will dangle on a hitch mounted carrier behind the car. That way, we’ll have the entire 57.5 ft3 (yes, I’m a geek) for our disposal. I’m not sure how exactly we’re going to arrange it. Leaving it to the Captain, it would be filled with three thousands pairs of shoes (each in their individual shoe box) and the rest of stuff packed in Wegmans shopping bags. Leaving it to our Explorers and it would be full of toys and garbage they can’t part with. Looks like yet another item on my to-do list… To keep things organized, I thought about stuffing everything into large, transparent, plastic containers. You can put them on top of each other, forming two layers inside the cargo area. Things used more often (like towels, bathing suits and sandals) will be sitting on top of stuff that we’ll only need sporadically (rain jackets or sweatshirts). Assuming all containers will be the same size and shape, packing will be no problem. Not even for the Captain… In case of emergency car sleepovers, we’ll be able to put an air mattress on the boxes and spend the night reasonably comfy (even though it might be terribly close to the ceiling). Accidental leakages will be contained to one box at a time. Same with unpleasant smells. Their waterproof quality will be helpful for packing and unpacking on those rainy days. Finally, once we settle for few weeks in a small apartment, we can stack the containers into each other and conserve living space as well. Obviously there will be some unused space in between boxes and the car, which I’m sure can be stuffed with smaller, soft items like  sleeping bags and pillows. I need to take exact measurements, but I believe we’ll be able to take 8 or 10 such boxes with us.

What are we going to pack? I mentioned the camping gear already. That includes a large tent, two large air mattresses, four sleeping bags, one large and one small tarp (to put under the tent), gas stove, lantern, flashlights and tons of other, smaller equipment. The kitchen will be reduced to a frying pan and a cooking pot, cutting board and a few sharp knifes, ceramic plates, bowls and silverware, first aid and roadside emergency kit, small toolbox, essential spares for the car and bicycles, ropes, bungees and a cooler. Those are all very typical road trip accessories, but we plan on taking also other items like laptops, wireless router, maybe a slow cooker or a juicer (or both?). And obviously hundreds of chargers and cables, because all of those devices use a different one. We will have a separate box for our Explorers books, toys and learning materials. Our reading and e-mail communication needs on the road will be satisfied by a Kindle (what a wonderful little gizmo!). Now we just need to think about a way to safely carry our passports and cash, especially once we cross the first border. Somewhere I also read that it’s a good idea to stop at a sign shop and make a copy of license plates, as they tend to be a hot commodity among some Latin American collectors. I’ll think about it in few months, once we get to Texas.

Those are our big travel plans. I’m sure there are plenty of people reading this post, who have their own experiences with road trip travels. We are always eager to learn from others, so please feel free to leave your comments below. In the meantime, we are going back to packing our suitcases for a flight to Poland next Tuesday. Or should we use plastic boxes…?

7 thoughts on “Road Trip Packing Strategies Revealed

Jon

WOW….reminds me of the planning (and lack thereof) as I prepared my family for our military relocation from Bangor, ME to Fairbanks, AK. This was back in the days when the ALCAN highway was 1500 miles of dirt and gravel, big bears, and critters that made weird sounds in the night.  We did the “tent thing” and for the first week it was just a camping trip, but soon turned into an effort of survival.  We get very spoiled living in the civilized world….rain forecast for this evening….no problem, we’ll spend the night in a hotel.  Not that easy on the road in the Yukon Territory….erecting our 10’x14′ Sears tent (the Hilton) in a rain storm still sends shivers up my spine….always bag your sleeping bags in plastic….nothing worse than a soggy sleeping bag!
Enjoy your adventure.
Jon
P.S.  Did the fella’ from Bomber ever contact you about renting your house? 

Reply
Geraldine

That might sound trivial, but I would suggest getting a set of travel towels instead of regular ones for the days you will be moving the most. They are not very nice to the touch, but they dry very quickly and you’ll avoid transforming your car into a giant line dryer for the day, to find that your towels are still wet when you’re dreaming about that hot shower at night – not even mentioning all the bad smell associated with a towel that doesn’t try properly!
If you plan to spend time camping around and open fires are an option, invest in a cast iron camp oven – they are very easy to use (drop everything in the pot, veggies and meat, and put ambers above and on top of the pot) and make the best meals! They also allow you to buy cheaper cuts of meat since the slow cooking will make anything tender and juicy.And containers are the best, definitely!

I wish I could be back on the road, reading your story 🙂

Reply
rbajan

Thanks for your tips Geraldine. I’ll definitely look into the cast iron oven. Actually, my wife has already researched the subject a bit and looks like it will get on our shopping list once we get back to the US.

Reply
rbajan

Hi Jon!

We have a few other prospects and it looks like the house will be rented soon. The Bomber fella called once few weeks ago, but we’ve never heard from him again… Wish us luck!

Reply
Robert

Thanks for your tips Geraldine. I’ll definitely look into the cast iron oven. Actually, my wife has already researched the subject a bit and looks like it will get on our shopping list once we get back to the US.

Reply
Robert

Hi Jon!

We have a few other prospects and it looks like the house will be rented soon. The Bomber fella called once few weeks ago, but we’ve never heard from him again… Wish us luck!

Reply
Ghislain Champire

I would have added a comment on your blog but for some reason, can’t log. Anyway, just wanted to say I fully understand section related to the concept of “shoes storage” !!!!

Reply

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